2ND IN OUR CONTRAST SERIES: A GALLERY35 SOLO EXHIBIT!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2022

In traditional quilting, the phrase “Sunshine and Shadows” refers to arrangements of quilt blocks creating a strong contrast of light and dark colors, often used in wedding quilts to reflect the ups and downs of marriage.

“In my fiber art I often make use of traditional “feminine” skills in a feminist, progressive response to current events and to the climate crisis.  But my fiber art is never exclusively political. My style often incorporates visual puns and a whimsical sensibility. It always reflects my openness to inspiration from unexpected finds in the urban environment and the sheer joy of playing with color and fiber.” —Jody Leight


Click on any thumbnail to open an enlarged view.
Then scroll down below each enlargement to find the artist’s inspiration and purchase information.

Artists’ Copyright
All works of art within this website are protected under U.S. copyright laws and international conventions. No portion of the artists’ works or statements may be used, downloaded, reproduced using any means, copied, linked to, or transferred electronically, without prior written permission from the artists. 

Gallery35 At Community
24 E 35th Street • New York, NY 10016
gallery35ny@gmail.com

GALLERY35 LAUNCHES A THEME FOR 2022/2023!

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2022

OUR FIRST exhibit contrasts work ON A CONTINUUM FROM REALISM THROUGH PURE FORM. Featured is WORK THAT represents reality, abstracts reality in varying degrees, has no relation to reality, or depicts the contrast itself.


Click on any thumbnail to open an enlarged view.
Then scroll down below each enlargement to find the artist’s inspiration and purchase information.

Artists’ Copyright
All works of art within this website are protected under U.S. copyright laws and international conventions. No portion of the artists’ works or statements may be used, downloaded, reproduced using any means, copied, linked to, or transferred electronically, without prior written permission from the artists. 

Gallery35 At Community
24 E 35th Street • New York, NY 10016
gallery35ny@gmail.com

OUR 3rd youth justice art show!

youth ages 14-17 use photography to explore concepts
of identity expression and identity oppression.

In a national climate where laws around individual rights are tightening, See You See Me offers personal perspectives of identity from youth rooted in the first Unitarian Universalist principle—the inherent worth and dignity of every person. This exhibition challenges viewers to connect with the deep impact of systemic oppression particularly on young, emerging identities and to consider the limitless possibilities of human potential that can be unlocked when we affirm that everyone has inherent worth and dignity. 

Click on any thumbnail to open an enlarged view.

Thorin, 17

If I could change anything in society around identity, it would be to erase the thought of judgment. Judgment creates so many negative things such as fear, self-doubt, racism, bullying, sexism, and so many others. If we were to erase judgment, I know for a fact that the world would be a much better place. 

Ciela, 15

Photography is a great tool for social change because you can capture a moment with just the click of a button. because a photograph speaks for itself and everyone interprets them differently. because there is so much room for creativity and unique styles. 

My identity and my creative work are so closely intertwined, my identity inspires my creative works and my creative works helped me discover my identity. I want to see change in the way our world is run. i want to see more underrepresented groups in positions of power so it is no longer old white men making decisions that barely even affect them. and I want to see change in the way people who are different than others are treated. and i want to see change in so many more things as well.

Logan, 15

Photography is a vehicle for social change because the images captured can be used to highlight the best and worst of humanity, justice and injustice, hope and despair. Images expose people to experiences and emotions they might not have otherwise. 

Grey, 15

Photography is a great tool for social change because a photo captures a moment as it is. You can’t fake the emotions a picture preserves. With words you can stop reading, but you cannot turn a blind eye to a photograph.

Kojo, 16

Photography is a great tool for social change because it can bring a new perspective to a real life topic also portrayed in an art form.

One way my identity is incorporated in my creative work is that I like to incorporate myself into a lot of the pictures I take so that you know it’s my work.

One thing that would want to see change in society is the ability to love one another as a community.

Ozzy, 14

My identity is very important to a lot of the different creative work I do. Mostly because I think it’s very important to be able to see yourself represented in media and just in general. It’s so comforting to see people that are like you and see that they’re going through similar things. It’s very important to me to be able to give someone else that feeling of not being alone in the community that they’re in.

Sitota, 16

Photography is a great medium for social change. It may be used to inform us about problems in the present and also shine light onto the past. From this, we learn to meet needs and make the world better for those ahead of us, no matter race, religion or background.

ONE THEME…MANY VISIONS!

MAY/JUNE 2022

Our artists have found multiple ways to enjoy the theme
just as you are invited to enjoy our FINAL exhibit OF THE SEASON.

Click on any thumbnail to open an enlarged view.
Then scroll down below each enlargement to find the artist’s inspiration and purchase information.

Artists’ Copyright
All works of art within this website are protected under U.S. copyright laws and international conventions. No portion of the artists’ works or statements may be used, downloaded, reproduced using any means, copied, linked to, or transferred electronically, without prior written permission from the artists. 

Gallery35 At Community
24 E 35th Street • New York, NY 10016
gallery35ny@gmail.com

ARTISTS EXPLORE MOVEMENT IN ART!

from the tiniest particle to the vast cosmos, MOVEMENT IS EVERYWHERE.

Enjoy our diverse visions FROM LITERAL INTERPRETATIONS TO ABSTRACT MOVEMENTS OF THE ARTISTS’ BRUSH—AND EVERYTHING IN-BETWEEN.

Click on any thumbnail to open an enlarged view of the artwork.
Then scroll down below each enlargement where you will find the artist’s inspiration and purchase information.

Artists’ Copyright – all works of art within this website are protected under U.S. copyright laws and international conventions. No portion of the artists’ works or statements may be used, downloaded, reproduced using any means, copied, linked to, or transferred electronically, without prior written permission from the artists. 

Gallery35 At Community • 30 E 35th Street • New York, NY 10016 • gallery35ny@gmail.com

SILHOUETTE SNAPSHOTS

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

ARTISTS BEV THOMPSON and MARSHA PERUO CAPTURE SILHOUETTES, SHADOWS AND ILLUSIONS THRU A UNIQUE AND CREATIVE LENS. THEIR EYE CAPTURES CONTRASTING LIGHT AND DARK, STRAIGHT AND CURVED LINES, FIGURE-GROUND TEXTURES AND COLOR FOR ENHANCED CONTRAST.

Bev Thompson has been behind one lens, or another, since her first Brownie camera, then thru her mom’s Polaroid. Later on, her 35mm cameras were all Pentax, from the very first model to the latest, used on 9-11; five of her photos now archived at The New York Historical Society and have been on tour to Arles and the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C.

She now shoots with a digital, an I-phone, and has caved in to using Photoshop to enhance her digital work. Her Way of Seeing the World in a frame is not in color, but thru dodging and burning the image in her mind’s eye.

To this day she still sees the light and dark in a frame – from a Black and White perspective – the techniques she uses for Silhouette Snapshots, and for her photos as a Dog Feature Writer for online and hard copy publications.

Bev’s Black & White photographic skills found their way to her hand. A Black and White Charcoal & Pencil, entitled “Sibling Rivalry,” of two dogs in a rumble, premiered at a special 2020 exhibition – The Dog Days of Winter – at the Museum of The Dog (MOD) in NYC on 101 Park Avenue. The museum maintains and archives the world’s largest dog art collection.

Marsha Peruo began exploring photography in the early 1970s when she was given her first SLR camera that used color print and slide film. Since she was limited by the number of photos on the roll of film, and had no easy way to edit the paper photo or slide, she challenged herself to format the final composition through the lens. Marsha still composes her photos on the screen of her iPhone 12 Pro, only rarely using digital editing software.

Marsha has been photographing shadows for many years. For her, outdoor shadow photography is about capturing a single moment as the sun moves across the sky, creating changing compositions of light and dark spaces. She focuses on the relationship between colors and value differences, and with the balance of shapes and lines on the picture plane.

Marsha began formal art lessons at the age of eight when her father took her to the Brooklyn Museum’s art school on Saturday mornings. She continued to be an “art major” from public school to graduate school, receiving an MFA in printmaking from Pratt Institute. Her work has been shown in more than 100 exhibitions and is in many private collections throughout the country. She’s been a member of many artist organizations throughout the years.

In addition to photography, Marsha works two-dimensionally in acrylics, watercolors, colored pencils, oil pastels, ink, and a variety of printmaking techniques. She enjoys combining different media in one picture so that the process is more challenging and the result is a unique visual statement.

Artists’ Copyright – all works of art within this website are protected under U.S. copyright laws and international conventions. No portion of the artists’ works or statements may be used, downloaded, reproduced using any means, copied, linked to, or transferred electronically, without prior written permission from the artists. 

Gallery35 At Community • 30 E 35th Street • New York, NY 10016 • gallery35ny@gmail.com

GALLERY35 TAKES A LOOK AT LIFE IN THE CITY!

MANY OF THE ARTWORKS FOCUS ON OUR OWN NYC…
OTHERS CELEBRATE METROPOLITANS WORLDWIDE!

Click on any thumbnail to open an enlarged view of the artwork  
with artist’s inspiration and purchase information.

Artists’ Copyright – all works of art within this website are protected under U.S. copyright laws and international conventions. No portion of the artists’ works or statements may be used, downloaded, reproduced using any means, copied, linked to, or transferred electronically, without prior written permission from the artists. 

Gallery35 At Community • 30 E 35th Street • New York, NY 10016 • gallery35ny@gmail.com

A TRIBUTE TO THE OLD, A VIEW TO THE NEW!

Our video invites you to take “a look back” at the good times
we shared in the space we have enjoyed since 2004!

25 FORMER and CURRENT Gallery35 artists HAVE JOINED TOGETHER
TO CELEBRATE THE PAST AND ANTICIPATE AN AMAZING NEW GALLERY!

Click on any thumbnail to open an enlarged view of the artwork  
with artist’s inspiration and purchase information.

Artists’ Copyright – all works of art within this website are protected under U.S. copyright laws and international conventions. No portion of the artists’ works or statements may be used, downloaded, reproduced using any means, copied, linked to, or transferred electronically, without prior written permission from the artists. 

CONTACT THE GALLERY TO PURCHASE ART

Gallery35 At Community • 30 E 35th Street • New York, NY 10016 • gallery35ny@gmail.com

NOT JUST US—PART I

GALLERY35 IS HOSTING A SPECIAL SUMMER YOUTH JUSTICE EXHIBIT!

NOT JUST US

Seven young photographers share their works produced during a 10-week photography workshop called ALL 8. Using all eight Unitarian Universalist principles as their lens, concepts such as social and environmental justice, equity, compassion, liberty, identity and radical inclusion are transformed through the visual medium, challenging all of us to consider what it means to put our faith into action.

This exhibition celebrates 10 weeks of unfolding, and turns up the dial on the voices of the future. 

CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON TO VIEW OUR VIDEO “ALL 8”

CLICK HERE to view part II
INCLUDES MORE WORK WITH FULL IMAGES AND ARTISTS’ STATEMENTS


NOT JUST US—PART II

OUR EXHIBIT FEATURES THE WORK OF STUDENTS AGES 14 TO 17 PRODUCED DURING A PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP CALLED ALL 8.
The program was designed by Jil Novenski, member of Gallery35 and Director of Religious Education for Children & Youth at The Community Church of New York. Peter J. Robinson, Jr., a past member of Gallery35, served as Guest Lead Instructor.


Grey, 14  (they/them) “Artistry is not just capturing what is around you. Every piece, every aspect also carries a part of your soul. I hope that people are able to sense and relate to that in my photographs. When it comes to my artwork, I want to be able to convey not simply an image, but a deeper meaning as well. I like to take ordinary aspects of life and make people question why they pass it by and why we are not paying more attention to what those things can teach us.


Thorin, 17  (he/him)  “Whenever I’m taking photos, I’m listening to music and entering a realm of creativity and peace. I like to raise awareness about injustices through my photography. I enjoy when people react to my work because it means that my work has made a powerful impact.”


Ciela, 14 (they/them) “Creativity helps me express myself and gives me a voice. I want my art to inspire others and show them that there is a way to make yourself be heard without even having to use words.”


Milan, 14  (she/her) “As a young photographer, I use photography as a way to express myself and share my view of the world. Because our own individual life expires, we all can see the same thing yet take away something different and I think photography is a perfect way to share that.I would say that my creative process is freeing, it’s nice to have a creative outlet, and the process of going out and taking photos, editing, brainstorming, and more, is relaxing.A lot of the time I take pictures just to take them, and then, later on, find a hidden meaning or message within them. However, shooting with a purpose and specific message in mind is extremely beneficial to me.”


Logan, 14 (he/him) “Hi, I’m Logan Creech. I find inspiration in shots that connect the viewer and me to nature, justice, and awareness about mental health. When I am in nature, I feel grounded, allowing me to be fully present with myself, quiet my mind, organize my thoughts, and reconnect to what is important in life.”


Sitota, 15 (she/her)

sArtists Copyright – all works of art within this website are protected under U.S. copyright laws and international conventions. No portion of the artists’ works or statements may be used, downloaded, reproduced using any means, copied, linked to, or transferred electronically, without prior written permission from the artists.