SILHOUETTE SNAPSHOTS

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

ARTISTS BEV THOMPSON and MARSHA PERUO CAPTURE SILHOUETTES, SHADOWS AND ILLUSIONS THRU A UNIQUE AND CREATIVE LENS. THEIR EYE CAPTURES CONTRASTING LIGHT AND DARK, STRAIGHT AND CURVED LINES, FIGURE-GROUND TEXTURES AND COLOR FOR ENHANCED CONTRAST.

Bev Thompson has been behind one lens, or another, since her first Brownie camera, then thru her mom’s Polaroid. Later on, her 35mm cameras were all Pentax, from the very first model to the latest, used on 9-11; five of her photos now archived at The New York Historical Society and have been on tour to Arles and the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C.

She now shoots with a digital, an I-phone, and has caved in to using Photoshop to enhance her digital work. Her Way of Seeing the World in a frame is not in color, but thru dodging and burning the image in her mind’s eye.

To this day she still sees the light and dark in a frame – from a Black and White perspective – the techniques she uses for Silhouette Snapshots, and for her photos as a Dog Feature Writer for online and hard copy publications.

Bev’s Black & White photographic skills found their way to her hand. A Black and White Charcoal & Pencil, entitled “Sibling Rivalry,” of two dogs in a rumble, premiered at a special 2020 exhibition – The Dog Days of Winter – at the Museum of The Dog (MOD) in NYC on 101 Park Avenue. The museum maintains and archives the world’s largest dog art collection.

Marsha Peruo began exploring photography in the early 1970s when she was given her first SLR camera that used color print and slide film. Since she was limited by the number of photos on the roll of film, and had no easy way to edit the paper photo or slide, she challenged herself to format the final composition through the lens. Marsha still composes her photos on the screen of her iPhone 12 Pro, only rarely using digital editing software.

Marsha has been photographing shadows for many years. For her, outdoor shadow photography is about capturing a single moment as the sun moves across the sky, creating changing compositions of light and dark spaces. She focuses on the relationship between colors and value differences, and with the balance of shapes and lines on the picture plane.

Marsha began formal art lessons at the age of eight when her father took her to the Brooklyn Museum’s art school on Saturday mornings. She continued to be an “art major” from public school to graduate school, receiving an MFA in printmaking from Pratt Institute. Her work has been shown in more than 100 exhibitions and is in many private collections throughout the country. She’s been a member of many artist organizations throughout the years.

In addition to photography, Marsha works two-dimensionally in acrylics, watercolors, colored pencils, oil pastels, ink, and a variety of printmaking techniques. She enjoys combining different media in one picture so that the process is more challenging and the result is a unique visual statement.

Artists’ Copyright – all works of art within this website are protected under U.S. copyright laws and international conventions. No portion of the artists’ works or statements may be used, downloaded, reproduced using any means, copied, linked to, or transferred electronically, without prior written permission from the artists. 

Gallery35 At Community • 30 E 35th Street • New York, NY 10016 • gallery35ny@gmail.com

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